Tell the story before the click, and de-emphasize the latter

It is important to emphasize the visual branding potential that still exists on Facebook. In other words, and often in fewer words, tell the story before the click.

Zachary's Takeaways

  • Use Facebook to its best capabilities by not waiting for people to click a link to see your story.
  • Focusing on one key part of your message ensures people are more likely to receive that message.
  • You still should provide a link in the text box to capture the clicks of your most interested fans.

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If you feel like your organization needs to do a complete turn-around and stop using Facebook for the click-through traffic, you probably weren’t using the social media platform to its fullest extent in the first place.

There has been a lot of online discussion lately about the loss of linked traffic from Facebook to a website. That is part of the risk we face when we over-extend our reliance on an external platform, especially one that has such power in the content and consumer marketplace. The rules change, and we must adapt.

When you can create concise, informative and eye-catching posts, you open up your content to more social media channels with little extra effort.

Fortunately, many organizations have not used the actual Facebook link post aspect of the platform. They have correctly opted to post the link in text form at the end of the paragraph. But now we must admit this point: It is important to emphasize the visual branding potential that still exists on Facebook. In other words, and often in fewer words, tell the story before the click.

Good photos with a clear, well-written sentence or a great quote with context will always work as standalone content on Facebook. It’s important to still provide a link for more information. If 20 people or 200 people want to know more, you will not want to miss out on the opportunity. Ironically, that same approach works on social media sites like Instagram, as well.

Regarding Instagram, you would not want to use the platform as a traffic-building tool for your website. I know there are people who are pretty restrictive about adding another social media channel to the content marketing approach because they fear they don’t have time to have a whole new content approach. Therefore they miss out on a key audience (depending on the channel you leave out, this could be teens, parents, professionals, etc.).

However, it makes far more sense to add the channel and fill it with existing content rather than develop a new strategy. Almost all of the content I generate from my school goes on all major platforms. I will do some things differently with Instagram (stories, for example), and use the maximum one photo on LinkedIn, and four on Twitter, and another four with a reply tweet, and eight or more on Facebook. You get the point.

I might edit a video differently for different channels, but not often. The general content, in essence the story you are trying to tell, can be  similar across the board.

This approach allows time for more content and less production work.